VEGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-I in Dx for Breast Cancer

VEGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-I in Dx for Breast Cancer

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of cancer disease. We investigated their levels and utility in comparison to cancer antigen (CA) 15-3 in patients with breast cancer (BC) and in relation to the control groups. The study included 100 women with BC, 50 patients with benign breast tumor, and 50 healthy women. The plasma levels of the tested parameters were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while CA 15-3 with chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. The results demonstrated significant differences in the concentration of the tested parameters and CA 15-3 between groups of patients with BC and healthy patients or patients with benign breast tumor. The plasma levels of VEGF and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were significantly higher in advanced tumor stages. The tested parameters were comparable to CA 15-3 values of the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, the predictive values of positive and negative test results, and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. The combined use of the tested parameters with CA 15-3 resulted in the increase in sensitivity, negative predictive value, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, especially in the combination of VEGF with tumor marker (84%, 73%, 0.888, respectively). These findings suggest the usefulness of the tested parameters in the diagnosis of BC. VEGF, especially in combination with CA 15-3, showed the highest usefulness in the diagnosis of early BC.
Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers – Where Are We Now

Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers – Where Are We Now

Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the Western world. Patient survival is highly dependent on the tumor stage at the time of diagnosis. Reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy is still a major obstacle in effective treatment of advanced disease. Due to the fact that colorectal cancer is mostly asymptomatic until it progresses to advanced stages, the implementation of screening programs aimed at early detection is essential to reduce incidence and mortality rates. Current screening and diagnostic methods range from semi-invasive procedures such as colonoscopy to noninvasive stool-based tests. The combination of the absence of symptoms, the semi-invasive nature of currently used methods, and the suboptimal accuracy of fecal blood tests results in colorectal cancer diagnosis at advanced stages in a significant number of individuals. Alterations in gene expression leading to colorectal carcinogenesis are reflected in dysregulated levels of nucleic acids and proteins, which can be used for the development of novel, minimally invasive molecular biomarkers. The purpose of this review is to discuss the commercially available colorectal cancer molecular diagnostic methods as well as to highlight some of the new candidate predictive and prognostic molecular markers for tumor, stool, and blood samples.
M-CSF, MMP-9 and TIMP-I Dx Biomarkers for Breast Cancer

M-CSF, MMP-9 and TIMP-I Dx Biomarkers for Breast Cancer

Macrophage colony­stimulating factor (M­CSF), matrix metalloproteinase­9 (MMP­9), and its specific tissue inhibitor ­ tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases­1 (TIMP­1) may play an important role in the pathogenesis and spread of cancer. We investigated the plasma levels of M­CSF, MMP­9, and TIMP­1 in comparison with a commonly accepted tumor marker CA 15­3 in breast cancer patients and in control groups. The cohort included 110 breast cancer patients in groups at stages I­IV. The control group consisted of 50 healthy volunteers and 50 benign tumor patients. Plasma levels of M­CSF, MMP­9, and TIMP­1 were determined by using ELISA, while CA 15­3 concentrations were determined by using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA).